Showing posts with label hazardous disposal. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hazardous disposal. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Nicotine Oil Disposal

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Monday, January 25, 2016

Why Did the NFL Reject Los Angeles Hazardous Waste Disposal Site?

Lost amid all of the hoopla of the NFL’s triumphant billion-dollar return to Los Angeles is a hazardous waste cleanup story featuring the former toxic waste dumpsite that almost won the bid to be a shiny new NFL home in Carson, California.
The proposed Carson site was presented as a rival bid to Stan Kroenke’s winning proposal from Inglewood and received the formal recommendation of “The NFL Committee on L.A. Opportunities,” a six owner panel. The 157-acre site located along the 405 Freeway that was proposed by the Oakland Raiders and the San Diego Chargers to house both teams is the former home of the notorious Cal Compact landfill.
A Checkered Past
In a 2003 story the Los Angeles Times outlines the checkered past of the Carson site. “The site for a stadium that could bring professional football back to the Los Angeles area is 157 acres of moldering garbage and toxic waste, a fenced-off field of weeds that leaks methane, spooks investors and attracts legal trouble.”
According to records tracing the history of the landfill, the Cal Compact facility opened for business in 1959 and operated until 1965. During its six years of operating history, the facility accepted household waste, industrial waste from nearby oil refineries, including drilling muds, waste paint, oil sludge and various solvents. (Source: South Bay Daily Breeze)
The site operated during a period of minimal environmental oversight when the dumping of toxic waste was an afterthought, a six-year period that has impacted the site for decades.
A Costly Cleanup
According to a January 2008 DTSC Fact Sheet cleanup on the site will be costly.
“Since 1988, DTSC has conducted several investigations of the former Cal Compact Landfill property. Due to the size and complexity of the site, the property was divided into two “operable units” (OUs). In 1995, a Remediation Action Plan (RAP) was completed and approved by DTSC for the Upper OU. In 2005, a RAP was completed and approved by DTSC for the Lower OU. Investigations conducted in the Upper OU showed the presence of landfill gasses such as methane, carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds, as well as metals in the landfill’s waste and groundwater in the Upper OU. “
According to a recent Los Angeles Times article:
“The city-operated Carson Reclamation Authority took control of the property last year. Under a complex land deal, the city gave rights until April for the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders to develop a stadium at the site.”
“The Carson City Council in May approved the sale of $50.5 million in bonds to complete environmental work. That and an additional $30 million from a prior owner’s insurer are funding the cleanup, City Manager Ken Farfsing said.”
“A water extraction system has been pulling out thousands of gallons of groundwater polluted with solvents. Extraction wells to remove methane and other gases are also operating, city officials said.”
While not publicly stated anywhere, one can’t help but speculate that the NFL owners’ decision to reject the Carson proposal is in part tied to the history of the land, and the costly steps required to get it prepared for the massive stadium construction process.
Times Have Changed
The effects of those six years of indiscriminate hazardous waste dumping back in the early 1960’s are still being dealt with more than 50 years later, making the reuse and redevelopment of the Carson site costly and troublesome. Probably too troublesome for the NFL.
This story of the failed Carson proposal once again highlights the need for stringent regulations and effective processes for the handling and disposal of hazardous waste. Saving a few bucks and trying to skirt government regulations with the handling of hazardous waste does not pay off in the long run.
While no one at Cal Compact broke the law during its period of operation, because the laws did not exist at that time, regulations were needed for hazardous waste disposal in Los Angeles and enacted shortly thereafter, changing the business landscape forever.
Two landmark incidents paved the way for United States environmental reform. For a historical perspective on America’s hazardous waste history take a look at our two-part series featuring articles on “The Cuyahoga River Fire,” and “The Love Canal” to learn about the man-made disasters that brought about the regulations that we deal with today. They were born out of a response to the careless handling of toxic chemicals and its impact on our working and living environment.
Richard Espinoza is VP of IDR Environmental Services.
https://www.environmentalleader.com/2016/01/25/why-did-the-nfl-reject-los-angeles-hazardous-waste-disposal-site/

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Guide to Identifying Asbestos Cement Transite Water Pipes & their Hazards in buildings

Photograph of  transite asbestos heating flueGuide to Identifying Asbestos Cement Transite Water Pipes & their Hazards in buildings
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  • TRANSITE WATER PIPES - CONTENTS: Asbestos-containing transite water pipes - is there a health hazard from drinking water that is delivered through cement asbestos water pipes?Vinyl-lined Transite Asbestos Pipe Hazards. Practical Hazards & Risks of Transite Water Supply Piping Mains. Safety hazards associated with transite pipe cement asbestos materials in buildings. How to recognize asbestos transite pipe materials in building chimneys, air ducts, water pipes

Transite Asbestos Cement Pipes: this article assists in the recognition of transite pipe used for water pipes, and discusses potential hazards of this material when it is found in buildings. Transite pipe is an asbestos-cement product which was used for both HVAC ducts and for chimney or flue material to vent gas-fired appliances as well as for water piping in some communities.
This article explains the potential health hazards (asbestos exposure by ingestion) as well as practical problems (fragility, collapse, expense of replacement) of cement asbestos transite pipe water piping and we provide citations to authoritative studies of this question. This document assists building buyers, owners or inspectors who need to identify asbestos materials (or probable-asbestos) in buildings by simple visual inspection. 
We provide photographs and descriptive text of asbestos insulation and other asbestos-containing products to permit identification of definite, probable, or possible asbestos materials in buildings.

Guide to Health Hazards of Transite Pipe Cement-asbestos Water Piping

Transite pipe or asbestos-cement pipes were used for water supply systems in some municipalities up into the 1970's in the U.S. and probably in other countries. In some cities (Ellwood PA for example), the transite water mains were found to be unable to reliably withstand high water pressures (up to 225 psi in Ellwood according to one of our readers) and the pipes were easily broken.
Asbestos fibers may be ingested from water supplied through transite water piping. Transite piping deteriorates over time, releasing asbestos fibers from the interior of the pipe into the drinking water flowing through that conduit. The level of health risk from ingested asbestos fibers is uncertain and probably low. An NIH report prepared by industry experts concluded:
The work group believes that the cancer risk associated with asbestos ingestion should not be perceived as one of the most pressing potential public health hazards facing the nation.
However, the work group does not believe that information was sufficient to assess the level of cancer risk associated with the ingestion and therefore, this potential hazard should not be discounted, and ingestion exposure to asbestos should be eliminated whenever possible.
Another study by Millette JR et als reported
Cancer mortality for the population census tracts of Escambia County, FL, which use asbestos-cement (AC) pipe for public potable water distribution, was compared with cancer mortality data collected from census tracts in the same county where other types of piping materials are used. An analysis of covariance was run to test for differences in standard mortality ratios for seven cancer sites among three potential asbestos exposure groups based on AC pipe usage.
Twelve variables representing nonexposure-related influences on disease rates were combined in four independent factors and used as covariates in these analyses.
No evidence for an association between the use of AC pipe for carrying drinking water and deaths due to gastrointestinal and related cancers was found. The limitations on the sensitivity of the analysis are discussed.
Also see:
  • ASBESTOS DUCTS, HVAC - Guide to Identification of Asbestos Materials On or In Heating and Cooling Duct Work: carbon monoxide hazards of transite chimneys and vents
  • TRANSITE PIPE AIR DUCTS - Hazards of Asbestos-containing Transite Pipe HVAC Ducts: duct collapse, mold, radon, asbestos fiber release
  • TRANSITE PIPE CHIMNEYS & FLUES - Guide to Identifying Asbestos Transite Chimneys & Flues & their Hazards in buildings
  • TRANSITE PIPE WATER SUPPLY PIPING - Guide to Identifying Asbestos Cement Transite Water Pipes & their Hazards in buildings
While an expert lab test using polarized light microscopy may be needed to identify the specific type of asbestos fiber, or to identify the presence of asbestos in air dust or water samples, many asbestos-containing building products not only are obvious and easy to recognize, but since there were not other look-alike products that were not asbestos, a visual identification of this material can be virtually a certainty in many cases. Links to U.S. government and other authoritative research and advice are included.

Vinyl-lined Transite Asbestos Pipe Hazards

A more immediate water quality hazard has been detected in some vinyl-lined transite water pipes - Tetrachloroethylene. A report on the Sandwich water district on Cape Cod in Massachusetts reported that
"PCE was detected in the distribution system at an annual average of 0.8 parts per billion, which is below the limit set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This substance leaches into the water from vinyl lined transite water pipe. In order to address this problem, in 2002 approximately 8,500 feet of water mains were sealed with an epoxy coating resulting in a dramatic decrease in PCE levels. "

Practical Hazards & Risks of Transite Water Supply Piping Mains

Leaks in transite water supply piping underground can result in substantial water losses in districts where this piping was used.
Locating transite water supply mains: We've been informed that excavators complain that its lack of metal makes locating transite water pipes difficult - one cannot use ordinary metal detectors.
Of course a buried pipe of non-metallic material might be located if it is possible to insert a sending probe inside its length but on a water main this procedure is impractical. Contractors joke that they find transite pipe by using the metal bucket of a backhoe as a pipe detector.
Replacement costs for transite water supply piping: because of its age, leaks, fragility, and difficulty of finding transite cement asbestos water supply mains and water piping without also damaging it at the same time, owners of properties and communities served by cement asbestos water pipes (transite) can expect to face increasing costs to replace that piping.
Asbestos fiber release hazards during removal of demolition of transite piping are discussed
at TRANSITE PIPE CHIMNEYS & FLUES.
Incorrect spellings of transite piping or transite duct material that we've seen include transit pipe, transit ducts, Transide pipe, transide ducts, tranisite pipe, and transight pipe. "Transite" is the correct spelling.

HVAC boot cleared of Asbestos in Los Angeles

http://www.ewastedisposal.net