Showing posts with label Green IT. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Green IT. Show all posts

Sunday, January 25, 2009

Waste-To-Energy System Could Mean Big Savings

IST Energy Corp. launched a waste-to-energy system into the consumer market that cleanly converts trash into electricity and gas heat.

The GEM3T120 can process up to three tons of paper, plastic, food, wood and agricultural materials daily into pellets. The resulting energy from these pellets is enough to power and heat a 200,000 square foot building housing more than 500 people. With no disposal costs for the waste it processes and the energy produced, IST estimates the GEM creates an annual energy cost savings of about $250,000.

"The GEM is the right product at the right time," said Stu Haber, president and CEO of IST Energy. "The GEM has created a value for every bag of trash we generate - first by eliminating the need for disposal and then by converting it into energy."

"This model can save businesses, institutions and municipalities hundreds of thousands of dollars annually," Haber added. "Never have sustainability and environmental stewardship been more of a focal point for Americans, especially considering President Obama's goals for energy independence."

The GEM can save consumers big bucks, but the benefits of using the system are not only financial. The GEM is eco-friendly and carbon negative, diminishing greenhouse gases by 540 tons annually. In fact, the system powers itself with the clean energy it produces.

Venues that are ideal for the GEM include:

Universities
Hospitals
Malls
Resorts
Amusement parks
Arenas and stadiums
Large apartment complexes
Office buildings and industrial plants
City transfer stations

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

'60 Minutes' examines the business of e-waste recycling

In Sunday's 60 Minutes, the CBS TV news magazine examines the lucrative but shadowy business of mining e-waste--junked computers, televisions, and other old electronic products--for valuable components, including gold. However, often illegal and hazardous activity creates toxic pollution, which in turn leads to brain damage, kidney disease, cancers, and mutations. In the segment, correspondent Scott Pelley examines the ethics of the recycling industry. (For the full 60 Minutes segment, see "The Electronic Wasteland.")



In the first clip, Pelley takes a tour of Denver electronic waste recycling company GRX, a member of "E-Stewards." The stringent program is run by the Basel Action Network, a watchdog group that certifies ethical recyclers that do not ship their toxic materials overseas.



In the second clip, the 60 Minutes crew chronicles piles of electronics blanketing the Chinese countryside waiting to be recycled. E-waste workers in Guiyu, China, where Pelley's team videotaped, put up with the dangerous conditions for the $8 a day the job pays.



In the third clip, scientists discuss e-waste, the fastest-growing component of the municipal waste stream worldwide, and the impact it has on those whose lives depend on it. The toxic pollution from black market recycling leads to brain damage, kidney disease, cancers, and mutations.



In the fourth clip, Pelley and his crew are attacked and threatened with violence by area gangsters overseeing the e-waste operations who tried to take the CBS team's cameras. The smugglers were trying to protect the lucrative business of mining e-wasted. However, Pelley's crew managed to escape and bring back footage of the hazardous activities.

HVAC boot cleared of Asbestos in Los Angeles

http://www.ewastedisposal.net