Saturday, May 15, 2010

Yahoo! News Photo - At the Aquarium - Yahoo! News Photos

Thomas M Abercrombie (tom@tomabercrombie.com) has sent you a news photo. (Email address has not been verified.)
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At the Aquarium - Yahoo! News Photos
http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Aquarium-photo-taken-April-2010-provided-Monter...

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Yahoo! News http://news.yahoo.com/

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Thursday, May 13, 2010

28th Street Newport Beach for a short surf session

Alex Lin, Teenage Activist

 

alexlin_postHe's overseen the recycling of 300,000 pounds of e-waste. He's successfully lobbied the Rhode Island state legislature to ban the dumping of electronics. He's used refurbished computers to create media centers in developing countries like Cameroon and Sri Lanka to foster computer literacy.

He’s Alex Lin and he’s just 16 years old.

“I don’t see anything uncommon in it,” says Lin, a high school senior from Westerly, Rhode Island. “My friends and I have been doing this since fifth grade. It’s become part of our lifestyle.”

Lin’s catalytic moment came in 2004 when he chanced upon a Wall Street Journal article. “It first alerted me to the e-waste problem, and warned of an e-waste tsunami to come.”

E-waste, or electronics garbage, is the fastest growing section of the U.S. trash stream. In 2007, Americans discarded more than 112,000 computers daily, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Even worse, just 18 percent of discarded televisions and computer products were collected for recycling.

While there is no federal law banning e-waste, 20 states have passed legislation mandating statewide e-waste recycling.......http://www.takepart.com/news/2010/04/05/alex-lin-teenage-activist

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Find this alley on Balboa Island in Newport Beach by Sunday and name the street where it begins, and all your dreams will come Thru!

Maya Plumbing from the new world

ScienceDaily (May 5, 2010) — A water feature found in the Maya city of Palenque, Mexico, is the earliest known example of engineered water pressure in the new world, according to a collaboration between two Penn State researchers, an archaeologist and a hydrologist. How the Maya used the pressurized water is, however, still unknown.

"Water pressure systems were previously thought to have entered the New World with the arrival of the Spanish," the researchers said in a recent issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. "Yet, archaeological data, seasonal climate conditions, geomorphic setting and simple hydraulic theory clearly show that the Maya of Palenque in Chiapas, Mexico, had empirical knowledge of closed channel water pressure predating the arrival of Europeans."

The feature, first identified in 1999 during a mapping survey of the area, while similar to the aqueducts that flow beneath the plazas of the city, was also unlike them. In 2006, an archaeologist returned to Palenque with a hydrologist to examine the unusual water feature. The area of Palenque was first occupied about the year 100 but grew to its largest during the Classic Maya period 250 to 600. The city was abandoned around 800.

"Under natural conditions it would have been difficult for the Maya to see examples of water pressure in their world," said Christopher Duffy, professor of civil and environmental engineering. "They were apparently using engineering without knowing the tools around it. This does look like a feature that controls nature."

Underground water features such as aqueducts are not unusual at Palenque. Because the Maya built the city in a constricted area in a break in an escarpment, inhabitants were unable to spread out. To make as much land available for living, the Maya at Palenque routed streams beneath plazas via aqueducts.

"They were creating urban space," said Kirk French, lecturer in anthropology. "There are streams in the area every 300 feet or so across the whole escarpment. There is very little land to build on."

These spring-fed streams combined with approximately 10 feet of rain that falls during the six-month rainy season also presented a flooding hazard that the aqueducts would have at least partially controlled.

The feature the researchers examined, Piedras Bolas Aqueduct, is a spring-fed conduit located on steep terrain. The elevation drops about 20 feet from the entrance of the tunnel to the outlet about 200 feet downhill. The cross section of the feature decreases from about 10 square feet near the spring to about a half square foot where water emerges form a small opening. The combination of gravity on water flowing through the feature and the sudden restriction of the conduit causes the water to flow out of the opening forcefully, under pressure.

"The conduit could have reached a theoretical hydraulic head limit of 6 meters (about 20 feet)," said Duffy.

At the outlet, the pressure exerted could have moved the water upwards of 20 feet.

"The experience the Maya at Palenque had in constructing aqueducts for diversion of water and preservation of urban space may have led to the creation of useful water pressure," said French.

The Piedras Bolas Aqueduct is partially collapsed so very little water currently flows from the outlet. French and Duffy used simple hydraulic models to determine the potential water pressure achievable from the Aqueduct. They also found that Aqueduct would hold about 18,000 gallons of water if the outlet were controlled to store the water. One potential use for the artificially engineered water pressure would have been a fountain. The researchers modeled the aqueduct with a fountain as the outlet and found that even during flood conditions, water would flow in the aqueduct, supplying the fountain, and above ground in the channel running off the slope. Another possibility could be to use the pressure to lift water onto the adjacent residential area for use as wastewater disposal.

"The palace has features that suggest something similar," said French.

The National Science Foundation and the Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies supported this work.



Depiction of Piedras Bolas aqueduct functioning as a fountain. This illustrates one plausible explanation of how the feature used water pressure. Due to destruction of the aqueduct, exact details of the its use are unknown. Note that during the monsoon, excess runoff flows over the feature while the buried conduit continues to function. (Credit: Reid Fellenbaum)

Posted via web from eWaste Disposal and Recycling

Maya Plumbing: First Pressurized Water Feature Found in New World

A water feature found in the Maya city of Palenque, Mexico, is the earliest known example of engineered water pressure in the new world, according to a collaboration between two Penn State researchers, an archaeologist and a hydrologist. How the Maya used the pressurized water is, however, still unknown.


"Water pressure systems were previously thought to have entered the New World with the arrival of the Spanish," the researchers said in a recent issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. "Yet, archaeological data, seasonal climate conditions, geomorphic setting and simple hydraulic theory clearly show that the Maya of Palenque in Chiapas, Mexico, had empirical knowledge of closed channel water pressure predating the arrival of Europeans."

The feature, first identified in 1999 during a mapping survey of the area, while similar to the aqueducts that flow beneath the plazas of the city, was also unlike them. In 2006, an archaeologist returned to Palenque with a hydrologist to examine the unusual water feature. The area of Palenque was first occupied about the year 100 but grew to its largest during the Classic Maya period 250 to 600. The city was abandoned around 800.

"Under natural conditions it would have been difficult for the Maya to see examples of water pressure in their world," said Christopher Duffy, professor of civil and environmental engineering. "They were apparently using engineering without knowing the tools around it. This does look like a feature that controls nature."

Underground water features such as aqueducts are not unusual at Palenque. Because the Maya built the city in a constricted area in a break in an escarpment, inhabitants were unable to spread out. To make as much land available for living, the Maya at Palenque routed streams beneath plazas via aqueducts.

"They were creating urban space," said Kirk French, lecturer in anthropology. "There are streams in the area every 300 feet or so across the whole escarpment. There is very little land to build on."

These spring-fed streams combined with approximately 10 feet of rain that falls during the six-month rainy season also presented a flooding hazard that the aqueducts would have at least partially controlled.

The feature the researchers examined, Piedras Bolas Aqueduct, is a spring-fed conduit located on steep terrain. The elevation drops about 20 feet from the entrance of the tunnel to the outlet about 200 feet downhill. The cross section of the feature decreases from about 10 square feet near the spring to about a half square foot where water emerges form a small opening. The combination of gravity on water flowing through the feature and the sudden restriction of the conduit causes the water to flow out of the opening forcefully, under pressure.

"The conduit could have reached a theoretical hydraulic head limit of 6 meters (about 20 feet)," said Duffy.

At the outlet, the pressure exerted could have moved the water upwards of 20 feet.

"The experience the Maya at Palenque had in constructing aqueducts for diversion of water and preservation of urban space may have led to the creation of useful water pressure," said French.

The Piedras Bolas Aqueduct is partially collapsed so very little water currently flows from the outlet. French and Duffy used simple hydraulic models to determine the potential water pressure achievable from the Aqueduct. They also found that Aqueduct would hold about 18,000 gallons of water if the outlet were controlled to store the water. One potential use for the artificially engineered water pressure would have been a fountain. The researchers modeled the aqueduct with a fountain as the outlet and found that even during flood conditions, water would flow in the aqueduct, supplying the fountain, and above ground in the channel running off the slope. Another possibility could be to use the pressure to lift water onto the adjacent residential area for use as wastewater disposal.

"The palace has features that suggest something similar," said French.

The National Science Foundation and the Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies supported this work.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100504155421.htm

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Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Chow line at 291

American Legion view from Bar

Dinner and elections tonite at American legion 291 Newport Beach California. hoo Yaa!

Wells Fargo Newport beach

Chico State wins National Guard FLW College Fishing event on Lake Roosevelt

ROOSEVELT, Ariz. – The Chico State team of Matt Dixon and Spencer Moran, both of Chico, Calif., won the National Guard FLW College Fishing Western Division tournament on Lake Roosevelt Saturday with six bass weighing 15 pounds even. The victory earned the team $10,000 to be split evenly between the school and the school’s bass-fishing club.

“This is unbelievable,” Moran said. “We wanted it so bad and we fished so hard. It was well worth it.”

Moran said the team’s day started out slowly, so they relocated and Moran soon hooked a 7-pounder on a Senko.
....http://www.collegefishing.com/tournament.cfm?tid=6174&t=news

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Really? Lender frets over walking homeowners

really

Real estate news and views from around the globe that make you go, “Really?”

  • DON’T WALK: JP Morgan Chase is warning investors that underwater homeowners may walk away from their mortgages, having “a significant impact on … the firm’s residential real estate loan portfolio.” (Huffington Post) MORE HERE!
  • $145B AND COUNTING: So far, the nation has paid $145 billion to bail out ailing mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Now Fannie Mae wants $8 billion more after reporting another steep loss for the first quarter. (AP) MORE HERE!
  • EXIT STRATEGY: The U.S. Senate approved a proposal to order the Treasury Department to study how to withdraw government support of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. (Bloomberg) MORE HERE!
  • DEAR MR. BILLIONAIRE: A resident pleads in an open letter with Kelcy Warren, buyer of a $46.5 million Colorado retreat, not to ignore nearby Pagosa Springs, Colo. (Huffington Post) MORE HERE!
  • RESISTING REFORM: Canadian real estate professionals oppose a move by the Competition Bureau to encourage more competition in the real estate market, saying it will lead to lower customer service. (thestar.com) MORE HERE!
  • SINGLE-LADY HOMES: Agents need to pay attention to single-female home shoppers. Unmarried women accounted for 21% of home purchases in 2009, while unwed males were 10% of the buyers, according to the National Association of Realtors. (MarketWatch) MORE HERE!

http://lansner.freedomblogging.com/

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Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Feds seize bank, sell headquarters, forget computers

Is it wise to hold on to investment property?

Q. I have an investment property in Jacksonville Fla. A single family dwelling purchased in 2006 for $209.000. The comps for like property are now selling at approximately $145.000. I have a first mortgage at 6.25% with a balance of $167.100 and a second at 8.25% with a balance of $30.245. The first is interest-only for 10 years and then is amortized over the remaining 20 years. at the same fixed rate. The second isn’t interest-only, as it’s basically PMI, since I only put 5% down at time of purchase. I have a monthly negative of approximately $500 a month including insurance, HOA dues, and taxes.


We’ve had a 20% pay cut in our take-home income for the last two years in order to keep our job. I’d like to make use of any possible government-backed program, since the first mortgage is Fannie Mae The second is owned by SunTrust.  They, SunTrust, are not interested in offering any assistance.
What questions should I ask each? If I do get assistance, I don’t want any entity coming after me for “lost money” in a short sale or a new party wanting any kind of money from me or my heirs. I don’t want to have to claim any kind of “forgiveness” as earned income for tax purposes. Is it possible to ask for the first to be brought down to current sale prices and have that balance amortized over 30 years at the current best interest available. I’d like to have the second forgiven, if possible, or at least rolled into Fannie’s new first.
My credit is very good, with FICOs from the very high 700s to low 800s. I’ve never missed a payment on any properties owned (5). All payments are auto-paid.
Read the rest of this entry »

http://mortgage.freedomblogging.com/

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Monday, May 10, 2010

Balboa Island, Newport Beach California

thomas m abercrombie has shared: College remains defiantly women-only: 'Better dead than co-ed'

College remains defiantly women-only: 'Better dead than co-ed'
Source: latimesblogs.latimes.com

Twenty years ago, they made education history. The students at Mills College in Oakland revolted against the administration's decision to go co-ed. The women chanted, they blockaded buildings, they argued their case on television talk shows and they helped produce...

 
thomas m abercrombie sent this using ShareThis.

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thomas m abercrombie has shared: Little Corona villa lists for $21M

Little Corona villa lists for $21M
Source: lansner.freedomblogging.com

 
thomas m abercrombie sent this using ShareThis.

Posted via email from Newport Beach Blog

Ricoh Unveils Carbon Tracking Tool for Printers

IBM, Ricoh Expand Sustainable Printer Offerings

As an example, users can track month-to-month trends in energy and paper consumption of their Managed Ricoh @Remote Compatible document output devices, allowing them to monitor fleet performance and the possible environmental impact they have on metrics such as CO2 emissions and conservation of forests.

The reports also include environmental metrics such as month-to-month energy consumption comparisons of the Ricoh devices and the amount of time each device spends in all power modes — operation, stand-by, energy-saving/low-power and sleep.

Ricoh says these metrics allow businesses and IT centers to better manage their fleet for increased energy savings, determining, for example, the timer adjustment of devices to go into low-power mode quicker.

The tool can ......http://bx.businessweek.com/e-waste/view?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.environmentallea...

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What is "Aging in Place"

Sunday, May 9, 2010

Trip Report: Freeblast, Munginella, Commitment, The Surprise

Day1: Freeblast (aka the first 10 pitches of the Salathe Wall) - 5.11b

 

I'd never climbed on El Cap before so this was my first time actually doing a route on this impressive piece of stone. The last time I was there, we were bandit camping illegally at the base -- I woke up early in the morning to wander over to the base of the class Nose route just to look up. At the time, I couldn't believe the boldness of the older generation to even think that such a face was possible.

 

The first 10 pitches of the Salathe Wall (aka "The Freeblast") take you up about 1000 feet to the top of Mammoth Ledges. It ascends a series of splitter cracks, hard slabby face, a physical roof and chimney system ("The Half Dollar"), before ending on a long, burly section of 5.7. 

 

Cory led all of the hard pitches, doing a great job on all of his sections. The climb was made more difficult by an extremely stiff wind and also the fact that a lot of pitches were running with water from melting snow and ice above. Periodically we'd have to dodge ice coming down from the upper pitches.

 

My leads were all really tough. I got to lead a beautiful 10c finger crack, but slipped in one particularly tenuous section. My 5.9 pitch up to the Half Dollar was also running with water, which didn't help my confidence too much. I was moving pretty slowly on this pitch, but it wasn't so bad once I got up and through the moves. 

 

Day 2: Munginella - 5.6

 

Perfect easy movement over stone. The first pitch is forgettable, mostly easy 5th class with an occasional harder move. The second pitch ascends a steeper corner on bomber foot and handholds. It's easy enough that you just fall into a rhythm of constant movement, interrupted by an occasional pause to place a piece of protection. 

 

Day 2: Commitment - 5.9

 

Two easy pitches leads you to the business, a strenuous and improbable looking move under a roof to a steep corner. The moves out from under the roof were tricky and stymied me -- I went up, felt it out and came back down a few times before committing. However, hidden holds appear just as it's feeling grim allowing you to pull into the corner. The 5.9 "lieback" corner wasn't much of a lieback. Tons of fun. By this time, Eu-Jin and I were falling into a nice cadence -- he'd get to the belay and immediately we'd start re-racking. Efficiency at the changeovers is key! 

 

Day 2: The Surprise - 5.10a

 

The hardest climb of the day. After doing two climbs on the Five Open Books, I cajoled Eujin into doing this (sorry!). Eu-Jin was a good sport, even when traversing the fairly unprotected and runout traverse on the second pitch. I have to admit -- a rusty old 1/4" spinner bolt doesn't really inspire confidence, especially when you're facing a fall of 30 feet! The end of the second pitch puts you on a tiny and cramped stance.

 

The next pitch was very worth it -- splitter cracks! I thought this pitch was pretty mellow for 5.10a, which made me really psyched -- I usually have trouble on 5.10 terrain. However, later, I realized that the pitch is actually 5.8  -- no wonder it was so easy. I really ought to pay better attention to the topos the next time around.

 

By now, darkness was beginning to creep up the walls and we were both anxious to get off before too long. Eujin arrived at the belay and i grabbed the gear and immediately started heading up the last 5.10a finger crack. This pitch was a bit tricker -- the crack was much smaller and I barely pulled it off, almost falling on the exit moves. Luckily I was able to just reach the rounded lip before manteling up. We finished 

 

Photos Courtesy of: 

 

 

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HVAC boot cleared of Asbestos in Los Angeles

http://www.ewastedisposal.net